PrEP is for Youth

FAQ

Got Questions about PrEP?

I am ready to start PrEP. What should I do now?

1. Find a local provider who provides PrEP -- to be connected to a Harriet Lane Clinic PrEP provider, click the "I WANT PrEP" button above. Here are some other resources.

2. Talk to your provider openly about risk for HIV. 

3. Figure out if your insurance covers it. Most insurances cover PrEP. There are pharmacy programs that help you if your insurance does not cover it. 

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Miles Oliva
Will my insurance cover PrEP?

If you have a health insurance plan through Priority Partners or another managed care organization (MCO), your prescription costs should be covered.

If the patient has a commercial health insurance plan, costs associated with PrEP will vary. Patients may have to pay out of pocket for the PrEP prescription, appointments, lab work, etc.

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Tarek Anandan
Are there programs that will help me pay for PrEP?

Yes, there are medication assistance programs. Gilead Advancing Access Program (Gilead Advancing Access Program) helps patients with no insurance, and the Truvada co-pay card helps patients with health insurance cover co-pays up to $3,600 a year. Many other programs exist: Patient Access Network Foundation (PAN), Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF), Partnership for Prescription Assistance, NeedyMeds, and RxAssist.

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Tarek Anandan
Are there side effects?

Yes. There are some side effects, which don’t last for long. PrEP has been FDA approved and is recommended by the CDC for people at high risk for HIV. Some people experience nausea for a short period after starting PrEP. Slight loss of bone density has been seen in patients, but bone density returns to normal levels after ending PrEP. The health of people on PrEP is monitored regularly by their physicians. No serious side effects have been observed.

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Tarek Anandan
Is PrEP safe for youth younger than 18 years old?

Studies have shown that PrEP is safe and effective for HIV-negative people to use. It helps them prevent HIV infection. There have been few studies that have included people under 18 years old. The studies that have focused on teens less than 18 years old have shown that  PrEP has few side effects, is safe and effective.

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Miles Oliva